Orchestration

Forums Film Scoring Orchestration Orchestration

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Eric Lein Eric Lein 10 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #1297
    Profile photo of Travis Lohmann
    Travis Lohmann
    • Topics: 2
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    Hi all, more of your opinions on this than anything.

    I guess the biggest things I’ve learned about orchestrating is learning to develop that “inner ear”, as well as score-studying a lot. One orchestration class in college I took, to me, it never really felt like an “orchestration class”, let me explain:

    Our big assignments were as followed:

    1) take Adagio for Strings, and condense it for piano.
    2) take Schumann’s Trauemeri and orchestrate it for strings.
    3) take a Mozart piano sonata and orchestrate it for winds and brass.
    4) take a Scriabin prelude and orchestrate it for full orchestra.

    I find it curious that all the assignments dealt with piano pieces being put for various other ensembles, so it never felt really like orchestration to me, if that makes sense. Thoughts? Evan, i know you mentioned before that the piano isn’t to be thought of as just simply “take what you play on there and simply transfer it over.”

    I’m rambling. Thoughts on this? How do YOU study orchestration?

  • #1506
    Profile photo of Travis Lohmann
    Travis Lohmann
    • Topics: 2
    • Replies: 9

    anyone? lol

  • #1514
    Profile photo of Mirza Aljic
    Mirza Aljic
    • Topics: 1
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    I read a lot about orchestration from all possible sources and books, trying to learn mostly on my own because I don’t have a degree in music (I attended an IT college).

    One of the biggest impressions I had so far is that orchestration feels like painting or even terraforming; the colors, the textures and the landscape of a musical environment are being formed by individual sections of the orchestra, and yet again it’s hard to look at each section as a separate entity or take it out of context because what the audience hears is the full “landscape”, they hear the “vista” that we need to create through careful choice of instruments and their co-relations, taking the original composition into account, of course.

    Maybe I went too deep with metaphors, but in my head, when I try to compose for an orchestra, I try not to dissect the individual pieces of it, I like to think that the orchestra is one breathing organism and its sections are merely organs that provide vitality and mobility. There I go with a metaphor again.

    As for the examples you mentioned, since I compose mainly in my DAW, I use the piano roll as a reference to all other instruments. DAWs are made to revolve around piano as a reference, because piano kind of feels like a mini-orchestra on its own 🙂

  • #1641
    Profile photo of Eric Lein
    Eric Lein
    • Topics: 3
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    There are some very highly regarded orchestrations of keyboard works. Webern’s orchestration of Bach’s Ricercar for example. Composing for orchestra shouldn’t not be “write for piano”, then orchestrate, but orchestrating piano works well is definitely a good practice.

  • #1643
    Profile photo of Eric Lein
    Eric Lein
    • Topics: 3
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    I tried to attach a link but was unsuccessful.

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