Joe Barlow

The Importance of Reverb on MIDI Mockups

Posted on 2016-08-20

I’ve currently been working on a piece for practice (as can be seen here; https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B2SiI7N68hyxa1BwakEzYTQ5VlU) and as I sat through the 2 minute scene for the 100th time I contemplated what the mix would sound like if I suddenly turned all my reverb off at once.

Wow.

Depending on the instruments, the results range from subtle to obvious.

Here is my mix with all my reverbs on;
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B2SiI7N68hyxWTMzX3FZVDJtM2c

And with all of them off;
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B2SiI7N68hyxOWJvVERybHZZUGM

The reverb adds so much life and depth that really helps the mix blend together into a singular piece of music, blending all the libraries together to seem more like a real performance.

I’ve also just taken a section of the brass stems to really see what’s going on.
again on;
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B2SiI7N68hyxZHBVU0s5cWdEYm8

and off;
https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B2SiI7N68hyxTEhRWGxiTUpKbEk

The low end stabs not only cut off very abruptly, but the very tone of them has changed. The reverb caused the short brass notes to artificially excite a room, which holds a majority of what a listener believes to be the tone of the brass section.

The mix doesn’t sound bad without it, they samples were still recorded on scoring stages, but they sound too cleanly separated. With MIDI mockups of orchestral music, where the aim is to convince the listener they are hearing a real orchestra, good reverb is the magic tool.

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